How to become an innovator

I’m following a training programme at the moment called ‘Researcher to Innovator’ (R2I). It’s run by the SETsquared partnership, which is none other than the global number one university business incubator!

There are forty PhDs and ECRs from five UK universities doing R2I. It’s shaping up to be a really enriching, awesome experience, which I would recommend to any junior researcher.

SETsquared have kindly given me permission to share some of the things I learn on the programme, so I’m going to kick off with tips I gathered at our first bootcamp on how to become an innovator.

Time is precious, so rather than share paaaaragraphs, I’ve put everything we need in infographic form.

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pdf here

How and why we can and should be more creative in academia

I spent the best part of a decade thinking there was no place in academia for paint, scissors and glitter glue. It turns out I was wrong.

Feeling my off the wall ideas were unwelcome, I’d been all set to walk away from academia after my PhD. That was until a couple of weeks ago, when I went to a university workshop on ‘creative journaling as a research method.’ Now I want to stay.

That day, enlightenment and salvation finally came, delivered by Dr Ian Cook, a tall man with thick-rimmed black glasses and stories of Lego and Guantanamo Bay. Ian talked about how he and colleagues in his department had used Lego to explore different news stories. The material nature of the activity had shaped both the process and the thinking. The team posted images of their creations on social media, and contacted some of those involved in the stories, many of whom responded; the use of Lego as a research tool sparked conversations that would otherwise not have taken place.

Not only did he illustrate that creative approaches do have a place in academia and are welcome, he also demonstrated why we should be more creative. And, unlike junior PhD student me, he’s a senior and respected academic. So, if he says it’s okay, then it’s okay! To pick out and paraphrase some of Ian’s points:

Why we should be more creative in academia

  • Processes of making and creating provide us with a different way of exploring the world
  • ‘Materiality and remembered physical experiences stimulate the imagination’ (Treadaway 2009: 236)
  • We need to make our research interesting for the people who are going to be reading it
  • What we are trying to convey might be better understood in different formats

In other words, creative approaches may give us greater insight, enable us to do better research and be better at communicating it.

Looking back over the past two and a half years of my PhD, I see my project has been peppered with creative moments which have been invaluable. These have helped me understand my research questions and talk about what I’m trying to find out with others. I’ve picked out six ideas that will hopefully inspire you.

 

1) Making sense of the literature

Reviewing the literature in the early stages of my research, I had information overload. I was trying to get my head around all of the factors that might have an impact on (Franco-)Belgian borderlanders’ speech and their beliefs about and attitudes towards language. I had compiled a long list, but it just wasn’t user friendly; I needed to see how they interacted. So I made them into a collage.

DSCN1215

(info here)

Not only did the collage help me to make sense of the literature, I have since gone back to it and used it to stimulate my own questions. Sharing it with non-experts, it has been a way for me to start conversations about my research.

 

2) Sharing a research experience with peers

I was asked to lead part of a discussion group at Cardiff University about my first experiences of fieldwork. I wanted my colleagues to feel what I had felt. So I drew a cartoon! Little bit risky!

FOXENLEDS12.11.2014 jpeg

(info here)

The storyboard format enabled my colleagues to relive my experience with me, but it was abstract enough to stimulate their own memories of fieldwork. What is more, it was so distinct from forms of presentation we are used to, it engaged and held their attention.

 

 

3) Developing a methodology

How do you get the measure of a person’s complex, composite, fluid identity? Thinking about this whilst planning my methodology, I felt a visual translation of identity might be more insightful that something gleaned from responses to a written questionnaire. I considered the dimensions of identity then thought how I could translate them into physical dimensions, for example:

Identity Cloud

  • Different traits become different colours
  • Importance becomes size
  • Interaction becomes spatial configuration
  • Fluidity becomes movement

What emerged from my reflections and discussions with peers was the idea of visualising identity through creating an Identity Cloud; a visual interpretation of the arguably intangible. Peers had a go at making their own identity clouds at a conference workshop. They described how the process of making and doing had stimulated thought and discussion.

(The image is of a made up Identity Cloud.)

(Check back for details of a forthcoming journal article about this.)

 

4) Processing and documenting the emotions tied to my own research experience

When I first moved to France for my year abroad, I started making postcards with chopped up free magazines and pens. I made them for no one but myself. When I looked back over them, I realised they were an articulation of my emotions – living abroad for the first time is pretty scary and challenging.

DSCN1212

I still make postcards whenever I’m abroad. I don’t really think about what I want to create; I just start chopping up magazines. Nevertheless, when I look back on my creations, I see that they are (sometimes cathartic) translations of emotions and experience. Looking at the postcards I created on my first trip to the field site reminds me how overwhelmed I was. I’m not sure I’d remember those emotions as clearly without the postcards, yet I think an awareness of the emotions we experience on our research journey is important in our understanding of our research and ourselves as researchers.

(info here)

 

5) Preparing to interpret my data

At the creative journaling workshop two weeks ago we were encouraged to explore part of our research. I’d brought along the questionnaire I gave my participants. One question asked participants the top five places they spend their time (it will contribute to an index for mobility). In the workshop I decided to try responding to this question visually.

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(info here)

Through creating this piece, I realised I couldn’t think about the places I spend my time without thinking about how I feel about them. The activity flagged up to me the fact that when I interpret my questionnaire data, I must remember that behind the quantitative responses are emotions and feelings and these may explain things better than numbers.

 

6) Sharing aspects of my research with non-specialists

Recently, I created a poster illustrating my research journey. Knowing the audience were not specialists, and that attention is precious, I wanted to do something engaging. Having decided to collect a ball of wool every place I stayed during my PhD, I made a poster telling the story of my research through swatches of wool.

DSCN1230

(info here)

The novelty, and the fact that viewers were encouraged to engage physically through touching the wool, appeared to engage viewers and passers by.

 

 

 

 

So why are creative approaches so marginal in academia?

The benefits of being creative are evident, and clearly people are being creative in the academy, but it’s definitely not the norm. I’ve been thinking about why this might be, and so far I’ve come up with five reasons (which I went into more detail about in a recent post):

  • The system has not been built for us to do it
  • We aren’t used to doing it
  • We don’t know what to do
  • We think we can’t do it
  • No one likes to fail

Nevertheless, there’s never been a better time to try something different!

Now is the time to go for it!

As I said in my previous post, ‘interdisciplinarity and impact might be unpleasant buzzwords in the minds of many, but, buzzwordiness aside, the do open up spaces in which creative approaches are more esteemed, if not encouraged. Technological advances, the move towards more collaborative work, and the rise of social media are also developments which work in creativity’s favour.’

What is more, beyond the academy others are getting on the bandwagon: in their document on ‘Digital Investigation and Intelligence: Policing capabilities for a digital age’ (April 2015), the College of Policing and partner agencies state ‘we need to engage with artists and innovators to help us think creatively and see things differently.’

If we don’t dare to try new things, how far will we get? Einstein was of the opinion that ‘doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results’ was tantamount to insanity. And Ed Catmull, the founder of Pixar, wrote a book about how creating an environment where people aren’t scared of failure is key for enabling creativity. 

Now, whilst I’m a fan of glitter glue and have A-level art to my name, I realise not everyone is in this position. But creativity is not limited to the art room – Lego, for example, requires no drawing implement. Everyone has the potential to be creative, and it’s something that must be practised and developed.

To finish I’m going to give you some ideas for ways to kick-start your academic creativity.

I’d also love to hear what you do to help you feel and be creative – do feel free to comment or tweet me. I’ll get our collected ideas together in another post!

20 ideas for kick-starting your academic creativity

Take little steps

1) If you’ve never done it before, submit a poster to a conference. It’s a well established format, so it’s not going to upset the academy; it’s just going to help you practise taking risks.

2) Physically chop up something you’re working on into sections and re-arrange it in different configurations; not just linearly. Keep rearranging and see what emerges when you change the connections in your research.

3) How much colour do you have in your work? Invest in a pack of felt tips or crayons and use them freely. Maybe get some stickers too.

4) Take a draft of a piece of your writing and illustrate it with stick people and images in the margins. Reflect on what emerges.

5) 1) Raid the recycling bag for magazines, then 2) think about any aspect of your research, then 3) start cutting and sticking without worrying about the outcome.

Seek out creative spaces

6) Find the space where your mind wanders and go there.

7) Seek out ‘interdisciplinary’ events or projects: discipline boundaries have already come down and there’s a sense of openness and exploration; an ideal space in which to take a risk.

8) Want to try delivering something in a new way? How about in a seminar in your institution? It’s not too formal, and you’re amongst familiar faces.

9) Want to try delivering something in a new way? How about in a seminar somewhere else? People have (maybe) got less of an idea of who you are. There are no preconceptions. What a way to make a splash!

10) Find public engagement opportunities. Engaging the public with our research requires us to bring them into the mix and that means we have to think differently.

Think differently

11) Play helps with innovation (Gross & Do 2009). Get out the Lego, plan a treasure hunt, turn your research into a Monopoly-esque game, make a costume and act out an aspect of your research.

12) Question why you’re not doing something differently. Is there a good reason why not? Would there be a good reason to do it differently?

13) Do you do any crafts (knitting, candlemaking…) or have any hobbies (baking, orienteering…)? Have you ever tried doing an aspect of your research with or through them? Try it.

14) Think about your research journey. Think about what’s happening and what you’re doing and feeling. How could this awareness shape what you’re doing and where you’re going?

15) Got a totally radical idea you love, but scared to go for it? Is what’s stopping you really a valid reason not to?

Learn from others

16) Seek wisdom and inspiration from people writing and speaking about creativity. Rod Judkins’ ‘The art of creative thinking’ is packed with ideas, and there’s a wealth of inspiration to be found in TED talks.

17) Go out and seek inspiration: visit a gallery, listen to a piece of music, go to a museum, go for a walk.

18) Have a conversation with someone about part of your research you’d never imagine having that conversation with. What comes out of it?

19) Talk to the people in your office, your institution, your network. And people who’ve got nothing to do with your area. What different things are they doing?

20) Look at how your or your friends’ children tackle a task. Try emulating their approach.

Kick-starting your academic creativity

(pdf here)

Don’t forget: I’d  love to hear what you do to help you feel and be creative – so feel free to comment or tweet me and I’ll get together a blogpost on our collected ideas.

References

Gross, M. & Do, E.Y-L. (2009) Educating the new makers: cross-disciplinary creativity. Leonardo 42(3), 210-215.

Judkins, R. (2015) The art of creative thinking. London: Sceptre.

Treadaway, C. (2009) Materiality, memory and imagination: using empathy to research creativity. Leonardo 42(3) 231-237.

 

What a five-year-old, seashells and formal semantics taught me about learning

Learning 2

What seashells taught me about learning

As a 17-year-old planning to pursue languages, my A-level biology coursework seemed interesting, but irrelevant. It involved comparing the apertures of seashells from two beach locations to see if there was a difference between the two datasets. To compare the datasets, we learned to use a statistical test called a t-test. Pointless, when you’re planning a career in languages.

I got my A-level, left school, pursued languages and then became a teacher. A decade later, I returned to uni and started a Masters in Linguistics.

There I took a module in accent variation. One of my assessments required analysing a person’s speech and comparing their vowel sounds. To do this, I was required to perform… you’ve guessed it…a t-test.

All this has taught me…

Sometimes things which seem irrelevant or pointless may turn out to be just the opposite. Since we can’t see into the future, we should never discount something on the grounds that it appears irrelevant.

What a five-year-old taught me about learning

A couple of weekends ago I had the total joy of helping my two small nieces with a craft activity. Earlier in the day their mum and I had discussed just how many arty things they produce, and how it was impossible to keep everything. I was thinking about that as I watched them decorating their boxes. I felt a tiny bit sad wondering whether these boxes were destined for ‘the great art gallery in the sky’.

But then I thought about what was actually happening.

There was an abundance of glitter glue and my five-year-old niece was, unsurprisingly, keen on using it. But rather than abstractly blobbing it on like her little sister, she wanted to use it like a pen to trace her drawings. As she started, it was pretty blobby and things were not going well. At that point her mum stepped in and guided her through it, showing her how to move the pen and get the glitter flowing at a better rate, then leaving her to try.

I watched my five year-old-niece go from a novice to competent glitter-gluer. The slight sadness was replaced with delight as I realised that it didn’t matter what happened to the boxes, because even if they didn’t make it, through doing the activity my niece had learned a new skill.

All this has taught me…

Often we focus on objects and outcomes, yet sometimes what is of greatest value is not the outcome, but the learning that happens in the process of creating it.

What formal semantics taught me about learning

I have never come closer to failing a module than when I took a compulsory Masters module in formal semantics. The utter agony and frustration of just not getting it. It’s all about using logic to represent language, and I just could not get my head around it. It is a small miracle that I passed that module and I was very happy to put it behind me in the spring of 2013.

A few weeks ago, I began developing a spreadsheet in which to analyse my doctoral data. Looking at my data, I knew I needed to reduce values to 1s and 0s. To do this, I worked out what I needed to do, then discovered on Google that the formulae I needed were logic formulae. As I wrote the formulae for my spreadsheet, I realised that not only did they make sense, but things I had been trying to grasp for months during my semantics course were finally making sense!

All this has taught me…

When things seem incomprehensible, sometimes it takes seeing them in a different context or a different application for them to make sense. And sometimes a bit of time and distance helps too.

10 reasons you should start a new hobby in the middle of your PhD

In the past few months I’ve taken up two new hobbies: making sourdough bread (at home) and dancing (in classes). I am so so glad I’ve done this.

If like me you’re right in the thick of your PhD, I would totally recommend starting a new hobby. Here are 10 reasons:

Hobby

  1. The anonymity

Ever get tired of the “how’s the PhD going?” question? Taking up a hobby where you meet new folk means you get to meet people who don’t know that you’re doing a PhD. And if they don’t know they can’t ask about it. Even if you do tell them, it’s still fine because you have something else to talk about: your hobby.

  1. The learning satisfaction

If you’re doing a PhD then you must love learning and getting better at things. When was the last time you started learning something new, then? What’s more, when you’re a beginner you see progress really, really quickly. How different to a PhD, eh? So satisfying.

  1. The liberation

Have you been told that when you do your viva you’re supposed to be the world expert in your topic? So, no pressure then. When you begin a new hobby, though, unlike with your PhD, you are a total novice. The people around you have no expectations. You are legitimately allowed to be totally rubbish, and that is so freeing and refreshing.

  1. It’s an Impostor’s Syndrome antidote

Following on from the previous point, seeing how rubbish you are at your new hobby and being okay with that (you’re a beginner – it’s expected!) does make you realise how much you know and can do in your own area of doctoral expertise, and realising this can help keep the Impostor’s Syndrome under control.

  1. It’s good for your sanity

A person could go insane thinking about the same thing all the time day in day out. But we PhDers often do, don’t we? It’s hard to stop thinking about the project sometimes. But if you’ve got something else to think about, like for example how to improve on the last loaf of bread you baked, it gives you a break from PhD thoughts, which can only be a good thing for your sanity.

  1. It gives you perspective

Further to the last point, there have been times when my entire world has been PhD shaped. And I usually don’t realise it at the time. However, when you incorporate your new hobby into your world, suddenly it can’t be PhD-shaped anymore. The perspective makes the PhD seem smaller. Always nice.

  1. It helps creativity

Having just suggested that a hobby will give you a break from thinking about your PhD, I’m going to do a 180. Sometimes when you’re sat at your desk trying to have intelligent, creative thoughts they just don’t come. Maybe because you’re trying too hard? A hobby will put you in a completely different space (in your mind as well as geographically, perhaps) and if the ideas won’t come at the desk, there’s a good chance that when your PhD brain is switched off is when you’ll get a breakthrough.

  1. It’s a productive distraction

Everyone needs downtime and distraction, and websites like Facebook or Buzzfeed are perfect because there’s usually something new, they are mindless, and quite simply they are there. However, I don’t know about you, but I do kick myself when I think about the time I waste on websites like those.

But if you’ve got a hobby things are different because you have a topic or activity or sport to research. So you can read about that. And since it’s going to help you get better at your hobby, it’s not wasted time at all.

  1. Life is short

PhDs are so naughty, aren’t they? They spread through your life an hour at a time, and before you know it Saturday is in the library, Sunday is just finishing a bit on this, oh and I’ll have to work late next week.

I could really do with working more on the weekends and in the evenings, but if I do that my whole life will become my PhD. Life is too short for it to equate to a PhD. It’s time to start living now, not when we’ve got our PhDs.

  1. It’s a back up career!

10 things to try if you’re struggling to focus

Usually I really struggle to focus. Last week was definitely my most focused week of work in a long time. I’m fairly certain it’s because I did all ten things listed below.

Why not try some or all of them if you’re finding it difficult to zone out of life, the universe and everything and zone into work?

  1. Switch off your emails

Unless you are expecting an important email there’s no actual reason to have your emails constantly logged in, is there? Every time something comes into your inbox and you notice it, it’s stopping you focus on work. If you open it it’s even more distracting. If it’s junk mail that’s even worse.

Check your emails at the beginning and end of the day. If you’re expecting an important one, check them near lunchtime too. But regain some control: it’s your inbox, so you decide when to look at it!

  1. Choose not to go on the net

The verb here is really important: choose. It’s a choice. If you switch off the Internet so you can’t access it, then implicit in the action is that you can’t actually control your urge to go on the Internet, so have to switch it off. That’s ridiculous, isn’t it? That the Internet has control over you.

So leave the Internet on, but choose not to open up a webpage (unless you need it for work). Each time you find yourself thinking of ‘just doing’ or ‘just checking’ something on the internet but decide not to, you’re regaining some control. It’s really empowering and the more you decide not to, the better you feel, and the stronger your ability to focus becomes.

  1. Have a jotter

Many thoughts will pop into your head throughout the day. “I need to email X, I’ll just Google Y…” the list goes on. Each time you stop to deal with any of those thoughts, you’re loosing time and focus. Chances are, none of those things need to be done now; it will be fine to do them at the end of the day. So do that.

And do this: get a good old piece of paper and pen and have it next to your computer so that whenever something comes to mind, you can scribble it down then move on, without even minimising the document you’re working on.

  1. Don’t check Facebook

When was the last time you procured significant, important or useful information from Facebook? Do you really need real-time updates of Frankie’s delicious lunch or Benny’s son’s latest sporting triumph? Save it for later!

The more time you accord to looking at selected pictures of your friends’ seemingly marvellous lives, the less time you’re according to making progress in your own life and work.

  1. Don’t go on Twitter

Twitter is amazing, right? There’s always loads of awesome and interesting stuff on your Twitter feed; it never disappoints, which makes it lethal and addictive. So unless you need to get on there for a specific reason (promotion, networking, or whatever), then just DON’T GO ON IT, you’re asking for trouble, and you’re asking for distraction!

  1. Don’t listen to music

Until the beginning of last week, I quietly held the mentality that if I could listen to music whilst working, then somehow I was beating the system a bit. However, for the next few months I’ve got no choice but to work without music, as I’m analysing  speech recordings. At first I was miserable at the prospect of working in silence: just me and my work. But quite quickly I realised it was okay; in fact, with no music engaging my brain, it was freed up to think more. Less brain noise = easier to focus.

  1. Put your phone on silent

This might result in you frequently pushing the button on the side that lights up the screen to see if there are any notifications on your phone. However, like with points one and two, by doing this you are at least regaining some control. It’s empowering, and so it’s a way of showing yourself that you value your work and your work time, and when you value something, it’s easy to give it your focus and attention

  1. Plan your work for your week

By making a plan for your working week, you’ve got something to keep you focused. This is especially important if you’re a PhD student where, without a plan, the working week ahead could consist of “working on my PhD”. Not that easy to focus on.

  1. Set daily targets at the threshold of your reach

In my experience, it’s key to set targets at the threshold of your reach. That way there’s a strong possibility that you’ll meet them, but you have to stay focused to do so. The challenge aspect and prospect of meeting a target serves as a great motivating factor, which will propel you forward and help you stay focused.

  1. Keep track of where you are with your work

Make yourself a tick sheet. Everyone likes ticks; they are encouraging and motivating. And the prospect of being able to tick more things off on your list can also be motivating and help you to focus.

In short:

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A seasonal science challenge!

Dear Friends,

I’ve got a seasonal science challenge for you!

My festive greeting to you is in the picture below.

Each letter has been replaced by an image which represents an element, unit, particle or measure which has the letter as its symbol.

Your challenge is to work out what the pictures represent and what my seasonal greeting is!

I’ll put the solutions up on 6th January: Epiphany!

Love, Sarah

P.S. feel free to print it out and use it to supplement the cracker jokes at the table!

Festive Greeting