Seven super useful professional skills a PhD gives you

It’s been a few months since I last blogged as I’ve been busy with my first post-PhD job in the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology. I’m really enjoying the work I’m doing, and I use my PhD skills everyday.

Since I heard it said during my PhD that it doesn’t prepare you for anything but an academic career, I thought I’d set the record straight here: it turns out lots of the things you have to do to get a PhD are really useful skills in the world of work.

So, for those of you who are worried that the PhD isn’t prepping you for life afterwards, let the next few hundred words reassure you as I talk about seven super useful skills that the PhD gives you, which will serve you well in the world of work – especially in the early days of your new job.

1) Being good at being a beginner
When you start a new job, you are a beginner. For some, that can be really intimidating; however, having done a PhD, you will have already survived being a beginner. Remembering this in the early days of your new job gives you strength and helps you when you have those inevitable wobbles.

Similarly, when you start a job, you will likely feel a bit of an imposter. However, you’ve had that feeling before, and you survived it back then. This too helps you in the early days to keep your calm and poise.

2) Being organised
This is not to be underestimated. When you start a new job, you will likely be responsible for looking after your files and a constantly refilling inbox. Having recently completed a PhD, you will be experienced in keeping tabs on a large number of documents. This will mean that you won’t feel too intimidated by all the new virtual papers and will just start organising as a reflex.

3) Meeting new people
Chances are that during your PhD you will have attended one or more conferences. This means that, on one or more occasions, you will have felt awkward about being in the presence of strangers. As uncomfortable as that may have been, I can promise you, it gets easier. And this means that, when it comes to the world of work, you will have already had practice of meeting new people. So you will have already started developing your coping mechanisms and will be well on your way to being an old hat.

4) Acquiring and filtering information
Come on now reader, surely this is an obvious one? If it’s not, then let me make it clear to you: you are absolutely awesome at this. You can’t get to the end of a PhD without being great at acquiring and filtering information. And this is a great skill in the work place – especially when you are starting out in a new job – because it means you learn the ropes quickly and can retain what you learn.

5) Managing your workload
When you enter the world of work, you might have to do what your line manager tells you, and have your time mapped out minute-by-minute, but it’s unlikely. Much more likely is that you will be responsible for your own time and workload and getting things done. Some might panic at this idea, but not you, for you have spent three plus years becoming a pro at managing your own workload, prioritising and juggling. You defo have the head start over the majority on this: feel smug if you wish – you deserve it!

6) Receiving feedback
No one likes getting criticism, however, as a former PhD-er you will have spent at least three years listening to one or more people telling you that what you have done is not quite good enough (although they hopefully packaged it up as “it’s good, but you could work on this bit”). This means that you are an expert at dealing with feedback from a senior person on your work. And this means that you will be able to engage positively with your line manager when he or she tells you that “what you have done is good, but maybe try this” (or words to that effect). 

7) Being open and trying new things
When you arrive in your new job, you will be joining a group of people who may have been there for some years (or maybe even decades). It’s quite possible that they will be following systems and procedures that have been in place for years. But maybe someone has identified that they could do things better or differently. Or maybe your organisation wants to do something new. If you’re in any of these situations, then you are on to a winner, because not only are you the new person (putting you in a good position to rock the boat – if you are brave enough (and I say go for it!)), but, having done a PhD, you are used to exploring new avenues not knowing where they will lead.

These aren’t the only skills you will be developing in your PhD. You’re also developing a few superhuman skills too (read my post about these here).

 

seven skills

Pdf here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Anarchy in the academy: why create an academic poster?

Academia is an institution predicated on convention. The choreography of our words, actions and – dare I say it – ‘outputs’ is implicitly shaped by the historical establishment. As well, of course, as by contemporary agendas: the need to publish; to be measurable; impactful; REFable. Typically, we operate in sentences and paragraphs, charts and graphs, chapters or papers. Images are often secondary, whilst for some they are a seemingly unaffordable luxury.

The academic poster is a form of knowledge communication which explodes the boundary walls of academic convention, opening up a space for alternative forms of expression. Prose is often ousted, or at least demoted, as shapes and forms, space and image shoulder the semiotic load.

The academic poster is an act of liberation – perhaps even peaceful protest. Not only for the researcher, but for his or her research. In our thesis we all tell the story of our research, except it’s not the story; it is merely a story: the tale we choose to tell as we navigate our way along the doctoral path: through supervision meetings, conferences convening colleagues and chapter revisions, towards the Mecca to which all PhD students are directed: the successful viva. Subverting the linear constraints of the thesis, the academic poster provides a stage upon which an alternative research narrative may unfold.

It is for the reasons above that I was drawn, some months prior to the submission deadline, to start planning an academic poster for last year’s postgraduate research showcase. I understand the constraints within which we as scholars must operate, and I know how to do so. Yet I am of an academic generation that is hungry for change, for opportunities to express, communicate and engage in the research process in new and innovative ways, a generation that has not been in the game for long enough to believe that change is not possible. The postgraduate researcher showcase provided me with a platform upon which to enact my frustration with the academy simultaneously with my belief in the power and value of alternative mediums of academic expression.

What is more, I don’t know about you, but I have to do a lot of reading and writing as a PhD student. Creating a poster gave me a break from obsessing over paragraph, chapter and thesis structure, as I was forced to think about colour and composition. It also made me feel good knowing that I was creating something that others would be able to engage with without having to burrow into line-crossing, multi-clausal sentences.

Creating an academic poster enabled me to see my research differently. Simple as. It also forced me to think about how to make my research interesting to an audience that isn’t composed of geeky linguists like myself. It required me to take off my academic blinkers and think about my research from a real world perspective. I have benefited from the activity, as has my research. I can’t really comment on the effects it might have had on others, although it did win the prize for most innovative poster, so I must have done something right. Which is interesting in itself, because what I did was cover my poster with actual swatches of wool. And the judges voted for it. Which goes some way to proving the point above: that there is power and value in alternative forms of academic communication.

So my advice would be to do two things: become proficient at operating within the rules, but also know how not to. Disrupt the norms, push the boundaries and challenge conventions, because that, dear colleagues, is what academia is really all about.

This post was originally written for the University of Exeter’s Doctoral College Blog, which can be found here

 

 

 

 

Advice for researchers on engaging with policymakers

Along with two awesome women, Zoe Bulaitis and Kate Massey-Chase, I am co-running a workshop this week on ‘Policy-making and the Humanities’. We’ll be writing and podcasting about it properly in due course, so check back here for more in the coming weeks. For now, and for our participants, here are some of the resources we’re using in the workshop.

Advice on engaging with policymakers can be found here:
How the arts and humanities can influence public policy – Huffington Post blog piece
What is the value of history in policymaking? – Institute for Government
Let’s close the gap between academics and policy makers: Peter Shergold on changing the system – The Conversation
How should academics interact with policy makers? Lessons on building a long-term advocacy strategy – LSE Impact Blog
The ten commandments for influencing policymakers – Times higher Education
How academics can engage with policy: 10 tips for a better conversation – the Guardian
Policy makers: guide to working with policy makers – National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement
Getting research into policy: the role of think tanks and other mediators – LSE Impact Blog
How academics and NGOs can work together to influence policy: insights from the InterAction report – LSE Impact Blog
Tips for engaging with government – Jo Clift Consulting
Maximise your impact – University of Bristol Policy Press Blog
Overcoming the five barriers to influence – American Management Association
Evidence for Health II: Overcoming barriers to using evidence in policy and practice – Health Research Policy and Systems

 

When writing a policy brief, here are some Government and Parliamentary avenues to explore to establish the relevance and timeliness of your topic:

Government:
Publications
Policies
Consultations

Parliament:
Hansard – a record of Parliamentary activity including: MPs and Peers’ written and spoken contributions; debates; petitions; and divisions.
Parliamentary research briefings including: Commons briefing papers; Commons debate packs; Lords in Focus; Lords library notes; POST notes; and POST briefs.
Commons Select Committee inquiries
Lords Select Committee inquiries
Joint Select Committee inquiries

European:
Topics of the EU
EU legislation

 

 

The darker side of the PhD and some bright lights to chase the darkness

Dear new PhD student,

This is the second of two posts of wisdom shared for you by 16 old PhDers.

In the first post, mainly keeping the words of the contributors, I shared our 13 top tips for you.

In this one we are going to level with you: we are going to talk about the ups and downs.

Read this when the doubts and negative thoughts begin.
Or read it before that happens, so that you’re better prepared.
And above all, remember we’ve all been there.

The darker side of the PhD and some bright lights to chase the darkness
Getting a PhD is hard and it’s okay to have bad days. Sometimes you will hate your PhD (and even your topic) and that’s okay and most assuredly normal. There will be times when you will want to give up. Mental health is a frequent concern and there will be dark moments for many PhD students. A peer writes:

The PhD is one of the hardest things I have ever done. I periodically felt like I was being ripped apart and put back together (by myself and my supervisor) without always being sure whether I had become a better student/writer/person in the process. I wish someone had really rammed it into my head that it’s ok to let other people know about this, and that sharing these concerns with my colleagues isn’t any kind of admission of weakness. It’s an admission that we’re humans and not machines.

So here’s what we suggest to overcome these feelings and challenges:

  • Remove the phrase ‘I’m so behind’ from your vocabulary and positively reinforce your progress.
  • Look after yourself: your wellbeing is essential for your work. Enjoy your life: don’t neglect your health or the people you care about. Don’t equate your schoolwork and your self-worth.
  • Stay close to people who aren’t in academia, and let them keep you grounded. And know that antidepressants and therapists are available and it’s ok to use them.
  • Remind yourself that it is a marathon and not a sprint. Monitoring yourself can ensure that you don’t burn out and you enjoy the PhD when you can and crack the whip when you have to!
  • Sometimes you won’t feel like you’re making progress, and that may feel frustrating at first. But it is actually very satisfying to pull yourself slowly towards a new idea. It is a privilege to be able to move slowly. Some ideas take a lot of baking. If you keep at it you may be surprised how much progress you were making even when it felt like nothing was happening at all.
  • But also, know that it’s okay not to know the answers (now and always), as long as you’re working towards finding out the answers (to the right and relevant questions, which aren’t always the questions other people ask).
  • Remember: success is just the result of a thousand false starts.
  • The going can be tough, but getting there (wherever ‘there’ is – the end of the thesis, the end of an article, the end of that one difficult day) can be hugely satisfying. A peer writes:

When you are in the thick of your PhD you will probably feel quite a heavy sense of self-loathing that everything is taking twice as long as expected and you have reached several research dead-ends. Try to keep hold of the fact that when you finish the thesis all these knock-backs will have made you a stronger person, you will have overcome obstacles that others would find impossible and achieved things that pre-PhD you would have quaked in your boots just thinking about!

  • Also, if you think about it, a thesis is a complicated piece of coursework. If you’re doing a PhD then you’re probably already great at coursework!

So yes, it is hard, and yes, it is challenging. But we are going to finish by reminding you how exciting it is:

What an amazing thing you’re doing!

This is your chance to indulge yourself, to spend a significant amount of time thinking about the thing you are most interested in, and to follow your own academic curiosity along a beautiful, winding path.

It’s a unique opportunity to develop yourself, to travel a bit and to make life lasting friends, not to mention friends you would never, ever have made otherwise.

Prepare for moments of extreme excitement: that breakthrough moment, anticipating your first results, succeeding at a new challenge…

You are lucky to have this chance; enjoy as much of it as you can.

Love yourself, love your work and embrace every opportunity that comes your way.

Get out there and stretch yourself.

Good luck!
Don’t panic.
You’ve got this.

From 16 old PhDers

darker-side-1

 

Thirteen top tips for new PhDers (from sixteen old PhDers)

Hello new PhDers!

So you’ve just begun a PhD. How are you feeling? Excited and energized? Or perhaps nervous and overwhelmed?

Doing a PhD is an amazing experience. But it’s also pretty challenging.

Two weeks ago I put a call out to the Twitter PhD community asking PhDers to share what they wish they had known at the beginning of their PhD. 15 people got in touch wanting to help give you a head start. Keeping their words, I have woven their wisdom together into two blogposts. In this first one, you’ll find our thirteen top tips.

Thirteen top tips for new PhDers (from sixteen old PhDers)

  1.  Know this: no one really knows what they’re doing at the beginning

It does become clear and you get the hang of it, but at the beginning everyone is clueless. Everyone feels unsure of themselves: you’re not alone.

  1. Use space well

Have a workspace (desk or whatever you like) separate from your sofa/bed/etc. How about this: find three different spaces: space to unwind, space to enjoy writing, and a space to enjoy thinking/reading (not necessarily the department!)?

  1. Get a routine set up

Get a routine from early on and treat the PhD like a job. Have small achievable goals set up throughout the starting months. Then, you know what? After a while the huge mountain you want to carve into a beautiful statue won’t seem quite so daunting (and you might even realise that tackling the whole mountain isn’t what you want to do anyway).

  1. Organisation is vital

Do what works for you, but here’s a detailed piece of insight from one of us:

I kept a database of references from the outset and I’m extremely glad I did so. In addition to notes on specific topics, I also made a collection of notes that didn’t fit in any category – I had a document called ‘observations’ that was just a collection of random notes – insights, ideas for research, questions, etc. In paper notebooks I would date such notes and label them ‘observations’. It was useful having seemingly random notes together in chronological order. I still do this and every few months I read through the notes, which a) reminds me of things I would have otherwise forgotten, b) reveals a coherence to my thinking that I would not otherwise be aware of.

  1. Write from the beginning

Write early and often. In fact, write something every day. Seriously, start thinking of how to write the document you’re working on – be it your thesis or a paper – right from the start, even if it’s just the structure. It’ll help to have a picture of the whole, which will also help you understand the context of the problems you’re working on. It will also help your motivation in the difficult times when you feel you’re stuck.

  1. Be wise about your supervisor

You will need to nurture a relationship with your supervisor. The importance of picking the right one shouldn’t be underestimated. Having such a one-on-one relationship with your boss can be hard and can feel isolating when things are not going as you hoped. Know to expect this and prepare yourself to handle bumps in the PhD supervisory road. Also: a friendly relationship with a supervisor isn’t the same as a good working relationship. Being brutally honest, two of us have shared:

I would not necessarily change my supervisor, but I wish I knew to look for someone with supervisory experience, perhaps attended a conference they spoke at to gain a sense of their style and personality.

I wish someone had told me that your supervisors cover up their own shortcomings because they are arrogant and vain; you can learn a lot from them, but it won’t be easy to work out what you are missing. Specifically, I regret not publishing more (at all) as a PhD student and I wish I’d worked out sooner that my supervisors weren’t publishing themselves and were not good mentors from a professional point of view.

  1. Pick an external examiner who will get what you’re doing

One of the most important things is picking an external who gets what you’re trying to do. And, whilst we’re on the subject, find out about your institution’s procedures regarding submission – for example when the deadline is, whether you can submit early etc.

  1. Prepare yourself for fieldwork

If you are including field research in your PhD then you have to be really strict in setting out deadlines of when certain aspects have to be completed: ethical consent, target groups, sample groups etc. Do this as soon as possible upon starting and have a realistic conversation with your supervisor, admin and other members of staff about what help you will need in order to be successful.

Being truthful, fieldwork can be really challenging – particularly if you’re alone out there. But it will be made easier by knowing this and preparing psychologically for it. Find others in your university or network who have done it and talk to them; they will get you in a way that those who’ve never done it just can’t. This is comforting and strengthening.

  1. Be curious and talk to people

Take a note of things that catch your attention and work out why they stand out. And tell people you meet what you are researching. Other people are incredibly useful as sounding boards and for ideas for avenues you may not have thought of and more books to read! Oh, and work on your elevator pitch from day one. (Elevator pitch = the short summary you’d use to ‘sell’ your PhD to someone in the time it takes to take a lift!) 

  1. Make friends

An honest truth? PhD work is often a lonely business. So talk to people, go along to things, make some friends; make friends with people who are in different departments, or not PhD students at all. You’ll need these people around you over the next 3 years.

  1. Look up and out from your books

Go to workshops on a variety of subjects (even if they don’t appear directly relevant), take part in committees, start a blog and Twitter account. Do all the things that you will wish you had done by the third year, but have no time to do at that point. And take risks! Honestly, use any excuse to get out and meet people because it’s surprising how many will share your enthusiasm and peculiarities. And because later on, when analysing and writing up, you might wish you had. Doing public engagement might help you realise why you started this whole thing in the first place! Oh, and if you teach, be nice to your undergrads.

And yet…

  1. Be protective of your time

Your time is finite: realise that you probably won’t have time for your other research interests. Say no to stuff in your own university that seems tangential and search out the networks that you are interested in and more linked to your topic. This will help with a job because it is unlikely you will be employed at the same institution as your PhD. In fact, you should know: academic jobs are few and far between and having a PhD is not going to guarantee you getting one. However, if you grab every opportunity that comes your way, the PhD will set you up with a lot of desirable skills.

  1. Be your own type of academic

Finally: be your own type of academic. One of the main things you will learn in your PhD programme is how to accept critical feedback. You have to develop your own style of doing this, and you have to remember that your professors are not gods, and don’t always know what’s best for you every single step of the way. Listen to their feedback, and that of your peers, but don’t let it drown out your own instincts. And don’t compare yourself to other academics or PhDers either; it is a one horse race. This is your work, it’s what you want to do, you don’t have to please anyone else, as long as you meet the basic criteria of making a unique contribution to new knowledge. Please yourself, stimulate yourself, thrill yourself!

 

In the next post I’ll share our advice on PhD struggles and how to overcome them, but for now I’ll leave you with a summary of our top tips:

top-tips

pdf here

 

How to become an innovator

I’m following a training programme at the moment called ‘Researcher to Innovator’ (R2I). It’s run by the SETsquared partnership, which is none other than the global number one university business incubator!

There are forty PhDs and ECRs from five UK universities doing R2I. It’s shaping up to be a really enriching, awesome experience, which I would recommend to any junior researcher.

SETsquared have kindly given me permission to share some of the things I learn on the programme, so I’m going to kick off with tips I gathered at our first bootcamp on how to become an innovator.

Time is precious, so rather than share paaaaragraphs, I’ve put everything we need in infographic form.

Slide1

pdf here